The European Aviation Safety Agency's (EASA) logo as shown on its social media pages.
On June 11th, common rules on European drones, Commission Delegated Regulation (EU) 2019/945 and Commission Implementing Regulation (EU) 2019/947, were published to ensure the safety and security of unmanned aircraft operations across countries in the European Union (EU) going forward. The European Aviation Safety Agency (EASA) wants to establish the free circulation of drones and a level playing field within the EU.
'Europe will be the first region in the world to have a comprehensive set of rules ensuring safe, secure and sustainable operations of drones both, for commercial and leisure activities. Common rules will help foster investment, innovation and growth in this promising sector' said Patrick Ky, Executive Director of EASA.
The new set of rules will be uniform so that drone operators both recreational and professional will have a clear understanding of what is permitted and what is illegal. Each type of operation will be covered in detail, from those not requiring any permission to the most advanced performed by certified remote pilots. Minimum pilot training requirements will be established as well.
Operators have a year to prepare for a new set of common drone rules that will transcend borders. Remotes pilots are currently required to abide by each country in the EU's specific set of differing regulations. By eliminating confusion on a country-by-country basis, innovation and growth will flourish.
'Once drone operators have received an authorisation in the state of registration, they are allowed to freely circulate in the European Union. This means that they can operate their drones seamlessly when travelling across the EU or when developing a business involving drones around Europe.'
'Once drone operators have received an authorisation in the state of registration, they are allowed to freely circulate in the European Union. This means that they can operate their drones seamlessly when travelling across the EU or when developing a business involving drones around Europe,' states EASA in a blog post.
While the EU regulation will enter into force in the next 18 days, it will officially be applicable in one year. This gives Member States and operators time to prepare and implement it. As of June, 2020, drone operators will need to register in the Member State, where they have their residence, or their main place of business.
There are some technical requirements as well. According to the same EASA blog post, new drones will have to be individually identifiable, allowing the authorities to trace a particular drone if necessary. A timeline of developments and applicability can be accessed on the EASA drone page.


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